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10ft Nuthatch - Instant Downloads
Full Plans - $50 -

I want a Study Plan Refund
Study Plans* - $15 -
 
PDF Model to print, cut and build - FREE Download - Click Here

*Cost of study plans will be refunded if a full set of plans is ordered within one year. To receive a refund, click the Submit button when you order. We will make the refund when we have had a chance to review your account.
Study plans contain 9 full pages of color drawings, a Bill of Materials and building text. It is almost the full set of plans but lacking dimensions.

10ft Nuthatch Specifications

Length:                   9’ 11”
Beam:                     56”
Weight:                   95 lbs
Max Outboard:        5 hp
Max Load:               500 lbs

After designing and building the 8ft Nuthatch Pram, I thought that a larger version of the hull would be a good fit in my series of stitch and glue boats. The main change in the 10ft and larger versions of the Nuthatch Pram from the 8ft hull, is the use of a curved arc on the bottom edge of the two side panels. On the 8ft hull, the bottom edge to the two side panels is a straight line. This was used to help in the lofting and construction process. The straight edge on the 8ft hull, also kept more hull below the waterline near the stern in this shorter version. Which in turn increased it's load carrying capacity, and increased it's stability. The larger hulls, from 10ft and up, have extra width and length to offset the need to keep the straight line on the chine seam. Plus the curve added to this and the other larger hulls, make the designs look better; with the smooth flowing (not quite parallel) curves of the chine and shear lines of the side panels. The curve in the side panels at the stern, also picks up the aft ends of the two bottom panels, and reduces the wetted area to improve rowing when solo in the boat.

As with all my previous prototype hulls, I have added the sailing option to this design. I do this to make sure that the daggerboard trunk and mast partner are located in the correct locations, and that the hull is a good sailor as designed. If you do not want that option, you can dispense with those instructions and drawing details. I have also added an "alternate" section to the drawing plans for a change in the seating locations, which may be more useful when used with an outboard motor to balance the hull. I have not listed any dimensions, because you may want to modify the locations of the seat positions.

I have gone to using the "enclosed pyramid" (with watertight hatches) style of seating in all my designs for safety reasons. After reading, and looking at the photos of a story in Duckworks Magazine dealing with the deep water self rescue of a brand new "traditional" small boat design (they couldn't); I will no longer include drawings or instructions for old style wooden plank seats. Your safety, and that of your family members is more important to me, than any negative comments about my hull interiors. This hull as designed, has around 4+ cubic feet of extra positive flotation build into the enclosed pyramid seating. That's over 240 pounds of extra support, along with the wood in the hull. The two handle/steps on the stern are there to help you or a loved one, get back in the boat again if needed. Always carry and wear, a life jacket adequately sized for you and your guests, and all in good condition.

This is the first hull design that I have put a scale model in a float tank to see where the hull floats with test weights. Before I have had to wait for an actual launch to determine the waterline of an empty hull, and then with real people. After tank testing the previously built PUD-g, and comparing that with it's launch photos; the 10ft Nuthatch Pram sets better than I though it would. I also discovered that I needed to change my ideas of where the best seat placement for use with an outboard motor would be, and have made slight modifications to the design part of my brain. ;) This will be a fun boat, enjoy.

Plans include the following PDF files:

  • Printable Paper model - FREE Download
  • 50 pages of instructions
  • 26 pages of detailed drawings (examples below)
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